Taco Bell Classic 2011
12/18/2010 7:23:12 PM
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Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3
Why can't SCISA runners compete in this? That is ridiculous.
Why can't SCISA runners compete in this? That is ridiculous.
12/20/2010 12:37:54 PM
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Joined: Nov 2008
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SCISA isn't a part of the National Federation of State High School Assosiations like the ones listed at this link: http://www.nfhs.org/stateoff.aspx
SCISA isn't a part of the National Federation of State High School Assosiations like the ones listed at this link: http://www.nfhs.org/stateoff.aspx
12/22/2010 7:26:13 PM
Coach
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The issue is that some schools from out of state have athletic associations that forbid them to compete against any school which isn't a member of its state (public) school association. SCHSL happily competes against SCISA, and would gladly let them run. But the very few SCISA athletes that would compete would effectively shut out many more from good schools that will not accept that. The rationale is that some states have numerous diploma mill/sports academy-type private schools that let postgrads compete, offer athletic scholarships, etc. (SCISA does neither.) This issue also affects the Wendy's XC meet at McAlpine and even the Penn Relays (they run a separate "prep school" heat in some events). The Rotary Roundball Classic basketball tournament in Charleston now runs two brackets so they can separate the independent schools from the NFHS members.
The issue is that some schools from out of state have athletic associations that forbid them to compete against any school which isn't a member of its state (public) school association. SCHSL happily competes against SCISA, and would gladly let them run. But the very few SCISA athletes that would compete would effectively shut out many more from good schools that will not accept that. The rationale is that some states have numerous diploma mill/sports academy-type private schools that let postgrads compete, offer athletic scholarships, etc. (SCISA does neither.)

This issue also affects the Wendy's XC meet at McAlpine and even the Penn Relays (they run a separate "prep school" heat in some events). The Rotary Roundball Classic basketball tournament in Charleston now runs two brackets so they can separate the independent schools from the NFHS members.
12/22/2010 7:57:31 PM
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Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 108
@CoachSalley Does taco bell allow unattached athletes to compete?
@CoachSalley
Does taco bell allow unattached athletes to compete?
12/23/2010 8:40:12 AM
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@OVER40RUNNER I don't think so. At least not if they are not members of NFHS. Otherwise, I'd run my guys that way. This rule is a relatively new (or I'm getting relatively old). I remember back in about 2005 that Graham Tribble of Ben Lippen ran really well in the 3200 at Taco Bell.
@OVER40RUNNER
I don't think so. At least not if they are not members of NFHS. Otherwise, I'd run my guys that way. This rule is a relatively new (or I'm getting relatively old). I remember back in about 2005 that Graham Tribble of Ben Lippen ran really well in the 3200 at Taco Bell.
12/23/2010 7:17:00 PM
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NFHS does not permit unattached runners. Graham did run a few years back but probably should not have competed. Track has become a sport with a lot of interstate travel which has caused many sanctioning issues. This is not just a track issue. As a side note, I was looking at the Chick-fil-a basketball results. A GA school and a PA school are scheduled to play private schools. GA & PA do not permit their schools to play private schools not in the NFHS. Wonder what will happen?
NFHS does not permit unattached runners. Graham did run a few years back but probably should not have competed. Track has become a sport with a lot of interstate travel which has caused many sanctioning issues. This is not just a track issue.

As a side note, I was looking at the Chick-fil-a basketball results. A GA school and a PA school are scheduled to play private schools. GA & PA do not permit their schools to play private schools not in the NFHS. Wonder what will happen?
04/03/2011 9:02:29 AM
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Joined: Jun 2005
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@Elgin Chalk this post up to longest lag between post and reply, haha. We're heading to Taco Bell next weekend, and in looking for info, I found this thread. Our state (KY) has gone through these issues, so here's what has come through our state. Initially, we were told 4-5 years back that we could only compete against schools who were members of their state association. Oak Hill Academy was cited as the type of school they were trying to keep us from competing against, as they apparently are not a part of their state association. Given that state associations follow NFHS (I assume pay a fee to become members), this rule is obviously designed to push schools toward membership. Unattached athletes, club athletes and so forth are included in this, as they are not part of their state HS association. A few years ago, our state adapted this rule. Although our team cannot compete against any non-member schools at an in-state meet, we are allowed to follow the rules of other states when competing out-of-state. That is, if we travel to an indoor meet in Ohio, and Ohio allows member teams to compete against non-member teams, then we are allowed to follow that rule and run our HS team in that meet. It doesn't seem to appear much in Cross Country or Outdoor Track, as most simply don't seem to accept non-member schools or individuals who don't compete for a school in their State's association. It seems to appear more often in indoor Track, at least in my experience. I know that NY has big issues with this rule, and won't allow their member teams/individuals to compete in-state or out-of-state against non-member teams/individuals. E.g., I was checking the sanctioning on the Arcadia Invitational in CA and noticed that NY did not approve sanctioning for that meet on the basis of non-member teams might apparently be competing.
@Elgin
Chalk this post up to longest lag between post and reply, haha. We're heading to Taco Bell next weekend, and in looking for info, I found this thread.

Our state (KY) has gone through these issues, so here's what has come through our state. Initially, we were told 4-5 years back that we could only compete against schools who were members of their state association. Oak Hill Academy was cited as the type of school they were trying to keep us from competing against, as they apparently are not a part of their state association. Given that state associations follow NFHS (I assume pay a fee to become members), this rule is obviously designed to push schools toward membership. Unattached athletes, club athletes and so forth are included in this, as they are not part of their state HS association.

A few years ago, our state adapted this rule. Although our team cannot compete against any non-member schools at an in-state meet, we are allowed to follow the rules of other states when competing out-of-state. That is, if we travel to an indoor meet in Ohio, and Ohio allows member teams to compete against non-member teams, then we are allowed to follow that rule and run our HS team in that meet. It doesn't seem to appear much in Cross Country or Outdoor Track, as most simply don't seem to accept non-member schools or individuals who don't compete for a school in their State's association. It seems to appear more often in indoor Track, at least in my experience.

I know that NY has big issues with this rule, and won't allow their member teams/individuals to compete in-state or out-of-state against non-member teams/individuals. E.g., I was checking the sanctioning on the Arcadia Invitational in CA and noticed that NY did not approve sanctioning for that meet on the basis of non-member teams might apparently be competing.
04/03/2011 11:35:31 PM
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Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 133
@professor This is in the best interests of the athletes, right NFHS and SCHSL?
@professor
This is in the best interests of the athletes, right NFHS and SCHSL?
04/09/2011 6:51:58 PM
Coach
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 43
@That0neGuy North Carolina has the same rule and it actually is in the best interest of some athletes. The rule was put in place because most private schools allow kids to repeat their junior year if they transfer in. In some cases(mostly basketball), you have 19 year olds competing against 14 year olds. This probably doesn't happen much in track but it's one of those across the board rules
@That0neGuy
North Carolina has the same rule and it actually is in the best interest of some athletes. The rule was put in place because most private schools allow kids to repeat their junior year if they transfer in. In some cases(mostly basketball), you have 19 year olds competing against 14 year olds. This probably doesn't happen much in track but it's one of those across the board rules

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